Home > News > Cambodia: Brothers Josep Maria Soteras and Ken McDonald

 


 



NewsChoose

  • News
  • 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004
  • Most popular | Statistics
  • Calendar
  • The latest news

 


Social networking

Marist Brothers

RSS YouTube FaceBook Twitter

 

Today's picture

Brazil: Solidarity Mission of the Province of Brasil Centro-Sul - Santos

Marist Brothers - Archive of pictures

Archive of pictures

 

Latest updates

 


Calls of the XXII General Chapter



FMSI


Archive of updates

 

Marist Calendar

21 July

Saint Lawrence of Brindisi
1951: The first brothers left for Japan

Marist Calendar - July

The General Council’s pilgrimage to Asia

 

Archive

Brothers Josep Maria Soteras and Ken McDonald

03/09/2018: Cambodia

"We had the privilege of visiting three Marist Presences in Cambodia: Takhmao, Pailin and Sen Monoron. The simplicity and commitment of the Brothers who worked in each of these places was obvious. At the centre of each ministry were the relationships with children and young people who live on the peripheries and are discriminated against. The presence of Marists, often in places where others would not go, gave hope of a future to disabled children, provided the opportunity for education to those disadvantaged by a corrupt system or were the stable presence of the church.

We also were able to visit two significant places from the time of the Khmer Rouge. One was S-21. This was a school in Phnom Penh which during the time of the Khmer Rouge was used as a torture centre. Many people including children were tortured here and the site has been kept as a memorial to those who died. The other was the Killing Fields where many were taken to be murdered. This experience leads us to reflect on the impact of such systemic violence and murder on a society. 

Also we became aware of the impact of the Cambodia economy on the lives of young people. Cambodia has liberal gambling laws and a thriving casino industry particularly close to its borders where foreigners have easy access. The industry entices young people to leave school early in the hope of a job and money. Often ending up in sex work and drug use.

The Marists in Cambodia are doing great work, making a difference in the lives of many people particularly the young."

1166 visits